Sugar-Added to Foods Linked to Heart Attack Risk

Many epidemiologic studies have suggested that high intake of added sugars is associated with increased heart attack risk factors (JAMA, April, 2010;21;303(15):1490-7). This month, a report from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey shows that eating sugar-added foods and drinks is associated with increased deaths from heart attacks (JAMA Internal Medicine, Feb 4, 2014).

The report shows that North Americans who take in 25 percent of their calories from sugar have a fatal heart attack rate 2.75 times those who take in less than ten percent. Those who take in ten percent of their calories from sugar have a fatal heart attack rate 1.3 times those who take in less than ten percent. The average person takes in about 15 percent of his calories from added sugars. More than 70 percent of North Americans consume more than ten percent of calories from added sugars. Ten percent consume more than 25 percent of their calories from sugar.

Warning Labels on Sugared Drinks? California Senator William Monning has proposed a bill that would require the warning on all beverage containers that contain 75 calories or more in a 12 ounce serving. The label would read: "Drinking beverages with added sugar(s) contributes to obesity, diabetes, and tooth decay. Sugared drinks are the major source of added calories in our diets. One soda a day increases an adult's chances of being obese by 27 percent and a child's by 55 percent, and it can increase diabetic risk by 26 percent."

Sugar-Added Foods Increase Diabetes Risk

Checked 3/20/16

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