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ABDOMINAL OBESITY AND HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

A study from Italy shows that men who store fat primarily in their bellies are at significantly increased risk for developing high blood pressure.

Many previous studies show that storing fat primarily in your belly, rather than your hips, is associated with being overweight and insulin resistant which often leads to diabetes. This study shows that storing fat primarily in your belly increases risk for high blood pressure, even if you are not fat and do not have diabetes.

People who store fat primarily in their bellies have a higher than normal rise in blood sugar levels that call out high levels of insulin which causes fat to be deposited in the belly. This study shows that high levels of insulin are independently associated with constricting arteries to cause high blood pressure. Storing fat in the belly increases risk for obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, heart attacks, and strokes.

The relationship of waist circumference to blood pressure: The Olivetti Heart Study. American Journal of Hypertension, 2002, Vol 15, Iss 9, pp 780-786. A Siani, FP Cappuccio, G Barba, M Trevisan, E Farinaro, R Iacone, O Russo, P Russo, M Mancini, P Strazzullo. Siani A, CNR, Inst Food Sci & Technol, Via Roma 52, I-83100 Avellino, ITALY.

Checked 9/3/05

May 19th, 2013
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About the Author: Gabe Mirkin, MD

Sports medicine doctor, fitness guru and long-time radio host Gabe Mirkin, M.D., brings you news and tips for your healthful lifestyle. A practicing physician for more than 50 years and a radio talk show host for 25 years, Dr. Mirkin is a graduate of Harvard University and Baylor University College of Medicine. He is board-certified in four specialties: Sports Medicine, Allergy and Immunology, Pediatrics and Pediatric Immunology. The Dr. Mirkin Show, his call-in show on fitness and health, was syndicated in more than 120 cities. Read More
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