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Swollen Testicles: Varicoceles and Hydroceles

Research has shown that most cases of swollen testicles do not need to be corrected by surgery. Swollen, painless testicles are usually caused by varicoceles, large veins full of blood on the outside of the testicles; or hydroceles, a sac of fluid around the testicles. Less common causes include infection or a tumor.

Impotence Linked to Heart Attack Risk

Two recent studies show that men who are impotent are at increased risk for heart attacks and should immediately change their lifestyles to help prevent a future heart attack. Men who are impotent usually have blood tests indicating high risk for heart attacks: higher levels of the bad LDL cholesterol and triglycerides and...

Fitness Prevents Impotence

A study in the Annals of Internal Medicine (August 2003) showed that lack of physical fitness is a major cause of impotence. Dr. Eric Rimm of the Harvard School of Public Health showed that men who run for three or more hours per week, or play tennis five hours a week, have a 30...

Permanent Birth Control Methods: Vasectomy or Tubal Ligation?

Will a vasectomy increase risk of prostate cancer? Whether the husband gets a vasectomy or the wife gets a tubal ligation is usually decided by who has the strongest will. Vasectomies and tubal ligations are safe surgeries, but the operation on a man is a simple cutting under the skin in an office, while the operation on a woman requires going into her belly in an operating room. Over the long haul, they both are safe and effective in preventing pregnancies.

Male Infertility

Infection is the most common cause of male infertility and that standard tests for infertility often do not find the infection. When evaluating a male for infertility, doctors check sperm count and sperm mobility. If a man's ejaculate contains fewer than 50 million sperm, he is infertile, and the most common cause of reduced sperm count is infection.

Testosterone to Prevent Heart Attacks?

We have no data to show that testosterone helps to prevent heart attacks in older men. In an effort to find out if taking testosterone could help to prevent heart attacks, doctors gave injections of testosterone to 45 men and placebo to 43 men for 40 weeks. Those treated with testosterone showed a reduction in the cardiac biomarker NT-proBNP, but no reduction in another biomarker, hs-cTnT.

Bicycling Does Not Raise PSA

A study from the University Hospital in Essen, Germany shows that riding a bicycle does not raise blood levels of PSA, the blood test used to screen for prostate cancer. Several studies suggest that ordinary bicycle seats can cause impotence which can become permanent with continued pressure on the nerves that control erection. Men who...

More Benefits of Mid-Life Fitness for Men

A study that followed 13,000 men from 1971 to 2009 shows that men who keep a high level of fitness from their forties onward have a one third lower risk overall of dying from certain cancers after age 65 (JAMA Oncology, March 27, 2015). Fitness was measured by their ability to keep on running...

Impotence is a Major Risk Factor for Heart Attacks

A review of published studies shows that the world-wide incidence of inability to achieve an erection varies widely from three percent to 76.5 percent, and the geographical incidence of impotence is associated with all the same risk factors as those for heart attacks, dementia and having an enlarged prostate (BJU International, July 3, 2019)....